Malaysia has aspired to be a fully developed nation with one ‘Bangsa Malaysia’ that is ethnically integrated, living in harmony  for Wawasan 2020 (Vision 2020)

Vision 2020 was initiated during the regime of former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohammad. Under the 1Malaysia concept initiated by the present Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak, Malaysia now aspires to achieve the status of a high-income developed nation by 2020.

SUMAZAU DANCE

This type of dance is one of the most well known traditional dances in Sabah as well as throughout Malaysia. It belongs to the Kadazandusun tribe. This ritual dance serves varied functions such as thanksgiving for bountiful paddy planting and harvesting, prayer against evil spirits, honouring the spirits as well as to cure illness. The movement and rhythm of this dance is elegantly soft and slow. The dancers, male and female, will face each other, move their feets in small movements and move their heels up and down to the beat of the music. While dancing the dancer will spread up their hands and move it up and down just like a bird spreading their wings to fly. The Sumazau is usually performed during festive occasions and gatherings.

This type of dance is one of the most well known traditional dances in Sabah as well as throughout Malaysia. It belongs to the Kadazandusun tribe. This ritual dance serves varied functions such as thanksgiving for bountiful paddy planting and harvesting, prayer against evil spirits, honouring the spirits as well as to cure illness. The movement and rhythm of this dance is elegantly soft and slow. The dancers, male and female, will face each other, move their feets in small movements and move their heels up and down to the beat of the music. While dancing the dancer will spread up their hands and move it up and down just like a bird spreading their wings to fly. The Sumazau is usually performed during festive occasions and gatherings.
 

Sumazau

The Sumazau dance can be considered the state dance of Sabah. The arm gestures are likened to that of a bird and it floats gracefully at approximately shoulder level with gentle bending of the elbow and wrist or alternatively is swung gently like a pendulum, parallel at the sides of the body.

The costumes are authentically Kadazan and are usually black in colour and made of a velvet type material adorned with the appropriate accessories.

The music is provided by gongs of different size.
SUMAZAU DANCE - The Sumazau dance is a mainstay of Kadazan culture. Kadazans are the most populous indigenous tribe in Sabah. Through a graceful rise and fall of their arms, the dancers mimic the eagles in flight. The song to which they dance, Jambatan do Tamparuli, "the bridge near Tamparuli town", is a well-loved classic in the state. Perhaps it is so well-loved because of the ease with which it can be performed. It is performed by school kids and professional dancers alike.
 



LIMBAI DANCE

This is an original traditional dance of the Bajau. The Limbai dance is performed during a wedding ceremony. It is an act of welcoming the bridegroom and his entourage and to invite them to the bride’s house. The melody and rhythmic movements of the dancer will accompany the bridegroom to the bride's house and would preceed the "ijab-qabul" or wedding ceremony. The graceful movement of the dancers’ wrists will sway their shawls to express their warm welcome to the party concerned.



SUMAYAU DANCE

This is the traditional dance of the Dusun Lotud ethnic group from the Tuaran district where it is also known as "Madsayau". The Sumayau is the main element of a special chanting ceremony or "Mengahau" as it is called in Dusun. It is not performed in ordinary celebrations. A "Monolian", an elderly female priestess who is also a ritual specialist, would lead the dance ceremony. It is a rule of the tradition that this role is held only by the descendents of the previous "Monolian".

"Mengahau" is a big affair and is usually celebrated for 5 days and nights. The purpose of this ceremony is to venerate the "gusi-gusi" (a type of antique jars believed to possess spirits) by chanting ancient ritual verses. It is also conducted to honour dead family members, similar to the "kenduri arwah" (feast for the departed) commonly observed by the Muslim Malay community.

As soon as the music starts, the dancers would sway towards the dance floor. Every movement of the hands would be in harmony with the rhythm of the music. However the movement of the feet are slower as compared to the hands. One simply walks with very small steps in an unhurried manner. The pace of the dance increase with applause from the audience.



MAGUNATIP DANCE

This dance belongs to the Murut’s tribe of Kuhijaw (Kwijau). The "Magunatip" word is derived from the "apit" word, which means "trapped". In this dance one must master and show their agility and dexterity in jumping and putting their feet between the clapping bamboos without being trapped. This dance does not usually require any instrumental music because the rhythmic clapping and stamping of the bamboos produce a loud, harmonised, beat and interesting sound or rhythm. This dance is usually performed to highlight any festive occasion.



ADAI-ADAI DANCE

Initially "adai-adai’ was a song sung as a "pantun" or a quatrain by a group of people. Instead of having an ordinary musical instrument to accompany the song, a natural sound or beat is formed from paddling a boat or stamping the paddle against the side of the boat and striking a "buyong" or "keduit" (a jar made from gourd or clay). This dance belongs to the Brunei tribe in Weston, Sabah.

DALING-DALING DANCE

This traditional dance was brought over from the Mindanao archipelago by the Suluks and does not originate from Bajau tribe in the Semporna district. The intermingling relationship between the Bajau and Suluk in those early days resulted in the dance becoming a living heritage of the Bajau community residing in Semporna. The phrase "daling daling" actually originated from the English word "darling". The main characteristic of the dance is the interchange of quatrains between the male and female dancers and is usually performed as an entertainment in various occasions.
 


斗湖文化嘉年華
Tawau Cultural Carnival 2007
24-25 March 2007

...see the unique culture and unity of Tawau community...

 

 

 

 

Cultural carnivals in Sabah represents multi-cultural communities get along with tolerance. When you attend a cultural carnival in any of the towns in Sabah.  You have an idea of what sort of ethnic races reside in that town and what their traditional costumes like. Most importantly these cultural carnival always promote unity and respect for each race within that community.

 

 

 

 

Discover Tawau's many colorful cultures.

Enjoy traditional dance performances.

See exhibitions on ethnic craft-making.

For more Information please contact:
Sabah Cultural Board
Telephone : +6088-268812/268884   Fax : +6088-264235
Email :
Rusman.Abdullah@sabah.gov.my   or  Mackey.Apison@sabah.gov.my 

Tawau Cultural Carnival   24th - 25th March 2007   Venue: Tawau Town Field

These 2-day event showcases the fascinating culture of the community in Tawau Division through displays of colourful dance performances, crafts and traditional games.

Tenom Cultural Carnival:    PESTA KALIMARAN   14th - 15th April 2007   Murut Cultural Centre, Tenom.

Sandakan Cultural Carnival   9th - 10th June 2007   Venue: Sandakan Town Field

Tuaran Cultural Carnival   21st - 22nd July 2007   Venue: Tuaran

Kudat Cultural Carnival  27th - 28th October 2007  Venue: Esplanade Sidek, Kudat

 


The main ethnic groups in Tawau are Malay, Kadazan, Chinese, Bajau, and Murut.

More about the ethnic groups in Tawau...


INDEX : CULTURE OF SABAH  March 24, 2011 10:17:48 PM

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